Biden Energy Sec. nominee Jennifer Granholm admits some jobs may be ‘sacrificed’ in climate push


By: - Climate DepotJanuary 28, 2021 5:05 PM

https://www.foxbusiness.com/politics/biden-energy-nominee-jobs-sacrificed-climate-push

President Biden‘s climate-inspired executive orders are resulting in his Cabinet picks getting grilled over the ensuing job losses that come from halting various projects.

On Wednesday, it was Energy Secretary nominee Jennifer Granholm, who was peppered with questions about the impact of Biden’s ban on future gas and oil leases on federal lands.

BIDEN ADMINISTRATION SUSPENDS NEW OIL AND GAS PERMITS, LEASES FOR 60 DAYS

“I’m just curious how a long-term ban consistent with the president’s goal of unifying our country and putting Americans back to work and helping our economies grow, how is that all consistent?” Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., asked after stating that tens of thousands of jobs will be lost across multiple states as a result of the moratorium.

In response, Granholm acknowledged that jobs may be “sacrificed” as a result of Biden’s actions, but expressed optimism that the gains would ultimately outweigh the losses.

“I think the president’s plan of building back better … would create more jobs in energy, clean energy, than the jobs that might be sacrificed,” Granholm said.

“But I will say this, no job — we don’t want to see any jobs sacrificed,” she added.

Further addressing the moratorium on public lands, Granholm said that “for those states that have these jobs in abundance is something we’re going to have to work on together to ensure that people remain employed.”

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Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., questioned whether or not President Biden even cares that jobs are being lost. He recalled that when Transportation Secretary nominee Pete Buttigieg testified at his confirmation hearing, he said that new jobs may not arise for years.

“I totally get the concern about job losses. Totally,” Granholm said.

Cassidy said that for a worker who just lost their job it is “cold comfort” to know that years from now there could be a job in a different location requiring different training.

“I completely understand what you are saying,” Granholm said. “What I can tell you is from my experience in Michigan is that when we focused on providing incentives for job providers to locate in Michigan in clean energy they came.”