RIP Renowned Princeton Physicist Freeman Dyson: ‘I have strong views about climate because I think the majority is badly wrong’ – Morano’s Politically Incorrect climate book excerpt


By: - Climate DepotMarch 2, 2020 12:34 PM with 0 comments

Freeman Dyson was featured in The Politically Incorrect Guide to Climate Change by Marc Morano

The Politically Incorrect Guide to Climate Change (The Politically Incorrect Guides) by [Morano, Marc]

Book Excerpts:

Page 46 & 115

Einstein’s Successor Touts the Virtues of Carbon Dioxide

Renowned physicist Freeman Dyson of Princeton’s Institute for Advanced Study, who has been called Einstein’s successor, says, “I like carbon dioxide, it’s very good for plants. It’s good for the vegetation, the farms, essentially carbon dioxide is vital for food production, vital for wildlife “The effects of CO2 on climate are really very poorly understood. . . . The experts all seem to think they understand it, I don’t think they do . . . Climate is a very complicated story. And we may or may not understand it better (in the future). The main thing that is lacking at the moment is humility. The climate experts have set themselves up as being the guardians of the truth and they think they have the truth and that is a dangerous situation.”

Prominent physicist Freeman Dyson, a professor emeritus of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton University, a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London, has referred to climate models as “rubbish.” Dyson is blunt in his criticism, mocking “the holy brotherhood of climate model experts and the crowd of deluded citizens who believe the numbers predicted by the computer models…. I have studied the climate models and I know what they can do. The models solve the equations of fluid dynamics, and they do a very good job of describing the fluid motions of the atmosphere and the oceans. They do a very poor job of describing the clouds, the dust, the chemistry, and the biology of fields and farms and forests.”

Page 127-128

Renowned Princeton University physicist Freeman Dyson, who has been hailed as “Einstein’s successor,” is another scientific dissenter on the political Left. “‘I’m 100% Democrat and I like Obama. But he took the wrong side on climate issue, and the Republicans took the right side,” Dyson explained in 2015. He called the UN climate pact “pointless” and explained, “pollution is quite separate to the climate problem: one can be solved, and the other cannot, and the public doesn’t understand that.”

According to Dyson, “The effects of CO2 on climate are really very poorly understood. The experts all seem to think they understand it, I don’t think they do. . . . I like carbon dioxide, it’s very good for plants. It’s good for the vegetation, the farms, essentially carbon dioxide is vital for food production, vital for wildlife. It would be crazy to try to reduce CO2. Earth is growing greener as a result of carbon dioxide.”

“I just think they don’t understand the climate,” he said, referring to climatologists. “Their computer models are full of fudge factors.”

“I have strong views about climate because I think the majority is badly wrong,” he said. “I think the notion that I always like to oppose the consensus in science is totally wrong. The fact is there’s only one subject that I’ve been controversial, which is climate,” he added. Dyson explained that climate change is
“the only field in which I’m opposed to the majority. Generally speaking, I’m much more of a conformist, but it happens I have strong views about climate because I think the majority is badly wrong, and you have to make sure if the majority is saying something that they’re not talking nonsense.”

Like many of his fellow skeptics on the Left, Dyson sees the faith in climate change as a religion: “There certainly is an enormous religion in which there are lots of true believers who think that climate change is evil and that we’re going to run into big catastrophes if we don’t do something drastic. That’s a sort of
belief system which exists.