STUDY: ‘Global warming’ causing an increase in ‘ecological grief’ – Published in the journal Nature Climate Change


By: - Climate DepotApril 16, 2018 4:47 PM with 0 comments

A new study appearing in the journal Nature Climate Change, claims that “global warming” is causing an increase in “ecological grief.”  “Climate change is increasingly understood to impact mental health through multiple pathways of risk, including intense feelings of grief as people suffer climate-related losses to valued species, ecosystems and landscapes,” noted the study published in  April 2018.

The study contends: “We argue that grief is a natural and legitimate response to ecological loss, and one that may become more common as climate impacts worsen…we offer future research directions for the study of ecological grief.”

The study also seems to issue a call for more funding to study “ecological grief” in its conclusion. “There is much (grief ) work to be done, and we need to do this work individually and collectively, publicly and privately, ethically and politically, in order to enhance our understanding of climate change impacts, and to expand discussions on what is to be done,” the study concluded.

This is the latest in a long line of studies claiming that alleged man-made climate change causes depression and anxiety. See: STUDY: Concern over climate change linked to depression, anxiety – ‘Restless nights, feelings of loneliness and lethargy’

The new book,  ‘The Politically Incorrect Guide to Climate Change’ By Marc Morano, details how climate activists are attempting to link mental health and “global warming.” See: Sold out! Politically Incorrect Climate Book sells out at Amazon, Target & Walmart! Ranked as ‘Best Seller’

Book excerpt:  “Stress, Anxiety, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder” – A 2014 report by the American Psychological Association (APA) and ecoAmerica, an environmental advocacy group, titled “Beyond Storms and Droughts: The Psychological Impacts of Climate Change,” claimed that extreme weather fueled by man-made climate change “will mean more stress, anxiety, PTSD in the Future” as well as growing “substance abuse” and “broad psychological impacts.”

In addition, a prominent climate activist took his own life to protest fossil fuel use in a New York City park. ‘As radicalized as the Islamic suicide attackers’ – Green activist burns himself to death to protest ‘global warming’

The authors of the new study claim: “We anticipate, along with a small but growing number of scholars, that ecological grief will become an increasingly common human response to the losses encountered in the anthropocene. To bear witness to ecological losses personally, or to the suffering encountered by others as they bear their own losses, is to be reminded that climate change is not just an abstract scientific concept.”

The study notes that “climate change” is “the source of much hitherto unacknowledged emotional and psychological pain, particularly for people who remain deeply connected to, and observant of, the natural world.”

See Full Study here: Nature Climate Change – VOL 8 | APRIL 2018 | 275–281 | www.nature.com/natureclimatechange

Study Excerpts: “Climate change is increasingly understood to impact mental health through multiple pathways of risk, including intense feelings of grief as people suffer climate-related losses to valued species, ecosystems and landscapes. Despite growing research interest, ecologically driven grief, or ‘ecological grief’, remains an underdeveloped area of inquiry. We argue that grief is a natural and legitimate response to ecological loss, and one that may become more common as climate impacts worsen. Drawing upon our own research in Northern Canada and the Australian Wheatbelt, combined with a synthesis of the literature, we offer future research directions for the study of ecological grief.”

Examples of “ecological grief” presented in the paper:

“I can’t stand the place blowing away. Dust! I get in bed and pull the rugs over my head so I can’t see it.”

“Inuit are people of the sea ice. If there is no more sea ice, how can we be people of the sea ice?”

“There is nothing else [we can do], we can’t dwell on it. Then we would be all suicidal. You just have to do the best you can with what change is coming.”

“Gradual and cumulative losses in the physical environment can also invoke complex grief responses due to the various personal and collective meanings attached to them.”

Study Conclusion:

Throughout this Perspective, we seek to present ecological grief as a legitimate form of grief felt in response to experienced or anticipated losses in the natural world and outlined what we believe are both important and urgent areas for future research. Given that we are living in a time of extraordinary ecological loss, and that these losses will not end any time soon, we anticipate, along with a small but growing number of scholars, that ecological grief will become an increasingly common human response to the losses encountered in the anthropocene. To bear witness to ecological losses personally, or to the suffering encountered by others as they bear their own losses, is to be reminded that climate change is not just an abstract scientific concept. Rather, it is the source of much hitherto unacknowledged emotional and psychological pain, particularly for people who remain deeply connected to, and observant of, the natural world. And while there are still many questions surrounding the concept of ecological grief, we contend that it is a powerful and useful concept, which allows people to articulate for themselves how this period of extraordinary ecological decline is affecting themselves and their communities.

Confronting ecological grief will be difficult and challenging work, both professionally and affectively. Indeed, to seriously engage with the concept of ecological grief is to become open, in a personal sense, to the magnitude of the ecological challenges facing our global society. There is much (grief ) work to be done, and we need to do this work individually and collectively, publicly and privately, ethically and politically, in order to enhance our understanding of climate change impacts, and to expand discussions on what is to be done. Here we find solace in the words of Parkes and Prigerson who remind us that to grieve is to find strength and maturity, and that ultimately grief might just be the “price we pay for love”.

“In many respects, then, grief can be regarded as an illness. But it can also bring strength. Just as broken bones may end up stronger than unbroken ones, so the experience of grieving can strengthen and bring maturity to those who have previously been protected from misfortune. The pain of grief is just as much a part of life as the joy of love; it is, perhaps, the price we pay for love, the cost of commitment. To ignore this fact, or to pretend it is not so, is to put on emotional blinkers, which leave us unprepared for the losses that will inevitably occur in our lives and unprepared to help others to cope with the losses in theirs.”

End Excerpt

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Related Links:

‘Good Grief!’ Climate Change Makes Warmists Depressed & Gives Them ‘Literal Nightmares’

EnvironMENTAL: Support group provides ‘a safe space for confronting climate grief’ – ‘The Problem With Climate Catastrophizing’ -Foreign Affairs Mag: ‘The Problem With Climate Catastrophizing – The Case for Calm’ (Written by )

Doctor groups take up ‘global warming’ advocacy – ‘Will tell the public their health is threatened by’ man-made climate – Patients should be prepared for future meetings with their doctors to include discussions of global warming.

Warmist Meteorologist: ‘Climate Change’ and Trump Have Driven Me to Therapy -Meteorologist Eric Holthaus: ‘I know many people feel deep despair about climate, especially post-election.” And it’s because of this, “There are days where I literally can’t work,” and “We don’t deserve this planet.’

Psychoterratica — environmentally induced mental distress

Warmist Joe Romm claims ‘higher CO2 levels directly harm human cognition’ & ‘Global Warming Threatens Labor Productivity’